Shakespeare      Shakespeare's Plays and Other Works
- The Tragedies - The Comedies - The Histories - The Sonnets
- The Life of Shakespeare - The Times of William Shakespeare - The Characters from Shakespeare - Stories and Plots
- Quotes from Shakespeare - Doubtful Works - Site Map - More ...
 [Shakespeare Quotes]     
 Home > Quotes
quotes from shakespeare

Shakespeare Quotations

The following are short quotations from Shakespeare. Notice how many phrases, metaphors and figures of speech in current use are derived from Shakespeare's plays. You may have used many of these phrases without even knowing that you were quoting Shakespeare!


I would fain die a dry death. The Tempest
---------------------------
What seest thou else In the dark backward and abysm of time? The Tempest
---------------------------
My library Was dukedom large enough. The Tempest
---------------------------
The fringed curtains of thine eye advance. The Tempest
---------------------------
Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows. The Tempest
---------------------------
He that dies pays all debts. The Tempest
---------------------------
A kind Of excellent dumb discourse. The Tempest
---------------------------
O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day! Verona Scene 3.
---------------------------
Except I be by Sylvia in the night, There is no music in the nightingale. Verona
---------------------------
How use doth breed a habit in a man! Verona
---------------------------
O heaven! were man But constant, he were perfect. Verona
---------------------------
Come not within the measure of my wrath.Verona
---------------------------
It is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Seven hundred pounds and possibilities is good gifts. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
.. when we are married ... upon familiarity will grow more contempt. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Sail like my pinnace to these golden shores. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Here will be an old abusing of God's patience and the king's English. Merry Wives
---------------------------
We burn daylight. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Why, then the world 's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
This is the short and the long of it. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Like a fair house, built on another man's ground. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
I cannot tell what the dickens his name is. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
As good luck would have it. The Merry Wives of Windsor
---------------------------
Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win By fearing to attempt. Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 4.
---------------------------
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
Condemn the fault, and not the actor of it? Measure for Measure
---------------------------
The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
The miserable have no other medicine, But only hope. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
..the poor beetle, that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
The cunning livery of hell. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
O, what may man within him hide, Though angel on the outward side! Measure for Measure
---------------------------
We would, and we would not. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
Truth is truth To the end of reckoning. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
They say, best men are moulded out of faults, And, for the most, become much more the better For being a little bad. Measure for Measure
---------------------------
What 's mine is yours, and what is yours is mine. Measure for Measure
--------------------------- My words fly up, my thoughts remain below
---------------------------
The pleasing punishment that women bear. The Comedy of Errors
---------------------------
A wretched soul, bruised with adversity. The Comedy of Errors
---------------------------
Every why hath a wherefore. The Comedy of Errors
---------------------------
A living-dead man. The Comedy of Errors
---------------------------
Let 's go hand in hand, not one before another. The Comedy of Errors
---------------------------
He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
There 's a skirmish of wit between them. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man. Much Ado
---------------------------
As merry as the day is long. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Speak low if you speak love. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps. Much Ado about Nothing.
---------------------------
From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot, Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Every one can master a grief but he that has it. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
The fashion wears out more apparel than the man. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Comparisons are odorous. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Condemned into everlasting redemption. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Patch grief with proverbs. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
I was not born under a rhyming planet. Much Ado about Nothing
---------------------------
Done to death by slanderous tongues. Much Ado about Nothing.
---------------------------
Light seeking light doth light of light beguile. Love's Labour 's Lost
---------------------------
At Christmas I no more desire a rose Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth; Love's Labour 's Lost.
---------------------------
A high hope for a low heaven. Love's Labour's Lost
---------------------------
That unlettered small-knowing soul. Love's Labour 's Lost
---------------------------
The human mortals. A Midsummer Night's Dream. ACT II Scene 1.
---------------------------
I hold the world ...-- A stage, where every man must play a part; And mine a sad one. Venice
---------------------------
The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.
---------------------------
He is well paid that is well satisfied. The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.
---------------------------
My pride fell with my fortunes. As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.
---------------------------
All the world 's a stage, And all the men and women merely players. As You Like It
---------------------------
Let us make an honourable retreat. As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.
---------------------------
An ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own. As You Like It
---------------------------
I 'll not budge an inch. The Taming of the Shrew
---------------------------
No legacy is so rich as honesty. All's Well that Ends Well
---------------------------
Love sought is good, but given unsought is better. Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 1.
---------------------------
To unpathed waters, undreamed shores. The Winter's Tale. ACT IV Scene 4.
--------------------------
Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale King John. ACT III Scene 4.
---------------------------
And oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse. King John
---------------------------
He will give the devil his due. King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.
---------------------------
Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere. King Henry IV. Part I.
---------------------------
The better part of valour is discretion. King Henry IV. Part I.
---------------------------
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. King Henry IV. Part II
---------------------------
Commit The oldest sins the newest kind of ways. King Henry IV. Part II
---------------------------
Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin As self-neglecting. King Henry V.
---------------------------
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more, ... King Henry V
---------------------------
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument. King Henry V.
---------------------------
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. King Henry V
---------------------------
I would give all my fame for a pot of ale and safety. King Henry V
---------------------------
Men of few words are the best men. King Henry V
---------------------------
that 's a valiant flea that dare eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion. King Henry V
---------------------------
Every subject's duty is the king's; but every subject's soul is his own. King Henry V
---------------------------
That 's a perilous shot out of an elder-gun. King Henry V
---------------------------
Winding up days with toil and nights with sleep. King Henry V
---------------------------
But if it be a sin to covet honour, I am the most offending soul alive. King Henry V
---------------------------
There is a river in Macedon; and there is also moreover a river at Monmouth;... and there is salmons in both. King Henry V
---------------------------
There is occasions and causes why and wherefore in all things. King Henry V
---------------------------
All hell shall stir for this. King Henry V
---------------------------
Halcyon days. King Henry VI
---------------------------
Delays have dangerous ends. King Henry
---------------------------
She 's beautiful, and therefore to be wooed; She is a woman, therefore to be won. King Henry VI
---------------------------
Main chance. King Henry VI. Part II.
---------------------------
Could I come near your beauty with my nails, I 'd set my ten commandments in your face. King Henry VI.
---------------------------
Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep. King Henry VI. Part II
---------------------------
The smallest worm will turn, being trodden on. King Henry VI. Part III.
---------------------------
Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind; The thief doth fear each bush an officer. King Henry VI. Part III
---------------------------
Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York, King Richard III
---------------------------
The world is grown so bad, That wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch. King Richard III.
---------------------------
Off with his head! King Richard III.
---------------------------
Lives like a drunken sailor on a mast, Ready with every nod to tumble down. King Richard III.
---------------------------
The sons of Edward sleep in Abraham'sbosom. King Richard III
---------------------------
An honest tale speeds best, being plainly told. King Richard III
---------------------------
Thus far into the bowels of the land Have we marched on without impediment. King Richard III
---------------------------
Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We write in water. King Henry VIII
---------------------------
Hear you this Triton of the minnows? Mark you His absolute "shall"? Coriolanus
---------------------------
Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. Titus Andronicus
---------------------------
The eagle suffers little birds to sing. Titus Andronicus
---------------------------
For you and I are past our dancing days. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
These violent delights have violent ends. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
A plague o' both your houses! Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
Taking the measure of an unmade grave. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
Meagre were his looks, Sharp misery had worn him to the bones. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
The strength Of twenty men. Romeo and Juliet
---------------------------
One writ with me in sour misfortune's book. Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 3.
---------------------------
Every man has his fault, and honesty is his. Timon of Athens
---------------------------
Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy. Timon of Athens
---------------------------
We have seen better days. Timon of Athens. ACT IV Scene 2.
---------------------------
The live-long day. Julius Csar. ACT I Scene 1
---------------------------
Beware the ides of March. Julius Csar. ACT I Scene 2.
---------------------------
But, for my own part, it was Greek to me. Julius Csar. ACT I Scene 2.
---------------------------
A dish fit for the gods. Julius Csar. ACT II Scene 1.
---------------------------
Et tu, Brute! Julius Csar. ACT III Scene 1.
---------------------------
Cry "Havoc," and let slip the dogs of war. Julius Csar. ACT III Scene 1.
---------------------------
Not that I loved Csar less, but that I loved Rome more. Julius Csar. ACT III Scene 2.
---------------------------
The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones. Julius Csar
---------------------------
This was the most unkindest cut of all. Julius Csar. ACT III Scene 2.
---------------------------
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not. Julius Csar
---------------------------
There is a tide in the affairs of men Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; Julius Csar
---------------------------
And say to all the world, "This was a man!" Julius Csar
---------------------------
Fair is foul, and foul is fair. Macbeth. ACT I Scene 1.
---------------------------
Stands not within the prospect of belief. Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.
---------------------------
Nothing is But what is not. Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.
---------------------------
Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Macbeth
---------------------------
I have bought Golden opinions from all sorts of people. Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.
---------------------------
There 's daggers in men's smiles. Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.
---------------------------
By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes. Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.
---------------------------
A deed without a name. Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.
---------------------------
In my mind's eye, Horatio. Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.
---------------------------
Brevity is the soul of wit. Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.
---------------------------
Though this be madness, yet there is method in 't. Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.
---------------------------
There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.
---------------------------
A dream itself is but a shadow. Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.
---------------------------
How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is To have a thankless child! King Lear
---------------------------
The prince of darkness is a gentleman. King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.
---------------------------
I do perceive here a divided duty. Othello. ACT I Scene 3.
---------------------------
For I am nothing, if not critical. Othello. ACT II Scene 1.
---------------------------
O, beware, my lord, of jealousy! It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on. Othello. ACT III Scene 3.
---------------------------
Poor and content is rich and rich enough. Othello. ACT III Scene 3.
---------------------------
But this denoted a foregone conclusion. Othello. ACT III Scene 3.
---------------------------
'T is neither here nor there. Othello. ACT IV Scene 3.
---------------------------
He hath a daily beauty in his life. Othello. ACT V Scene 1.
---------------------------
My salad days, When I was green in judgment. Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 5.
---------------------------
He wears the rose Of youth upon him. Antony and Cleopatra. ACT III Scene 13.
---------------------------
The game is up. Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 3.
---------------------------
I have not slept one wink. Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.
---------------------------
Full many a glorious morning have I seen. Sonnet XXXIII
---------------------------
My grief lies onward and my joy behind. Sonnet I
---------------------------
Cursed be he that moves my bones. Shakespeare's Epitaph.
---------------------------
     Shakespeare's Plays and Other Works - The Tragedies - The Comedies - The Histories - The Sonnets - The Life of Shakespeare - The Times of William Shakespeare - The Characters from Shakespeare - Stories and Plots - Quotes from Shakespeare - Doubtful Works
- Study Guide - About Us - Privacy Policy - Site Map - More ...

Buy Books at Amazon.com and Save!